Mometasone Furoate Cream For Dark Spots – Uses and Benefits

Home Health Mometasone Furoate Cream For Dark Spots - Uses and Benefits

Mometasone furoate cream for dark spots

The cream can be used as part of conjugated treatments for the face blemishes known as melasma.

Mometasone furoate belongs to the group of topical glucocorticoids and acts as an anti-inflammatory and antipruritic in skin conditions.

Mometasone Furoate is indicated for the relief of inflammatory and pruritic (itchy) manifestations of dermatosis that respond to treatment with glucocorticoids such as psoriasis (skin disease characterized by desquamation) and atopic dermatitis.

Before you use

Do not use Mometasone Furoate:

If you are allergic to mometasone furoate or another glucocorticoid, or to any of the components of this speciality.

Take special care with Mometasone Furoate:

When treating large body surfaces, when using occlusive cures, in long-term treatments or in applications to facial skin or skin folds.

Avoid contact with eyes in case of accidental contact, flush eyes with plenty of water.

Using other medicines:

Inform your doctor or pharmacist if you are using or have recently used any other medicines, even those obtained without a prescription.

Pregnancy and lactation:

Consult your doctor or pharmacist before using any medicine.

Mometasone Furoate cutaneous solution should be avoided in pregnant or breastfeeding women, except by prescription.

Driving and using machines:

There are no known data to suggest that the product may affect the ability to drive or operate machinery.

Important information about some of the ingredients of Mometasone Furoate cutaneous solution:

This medicine contains propylene glycol, which can cause skin irritation.

How to use

Follow these instructions for use, unless your doctor has given you different instructions.

Remember to use your medicine.

Your doctor will indicate the duration of treatment with Mometasone furoate in cutaneous solution. Do not stop treatment on your own.

If you feel that the action of Mometasone Furoate in cutaneous solution is too strong or weak, please tell your doctor or pharmacist.

Avoid abrupt withdrawal of treatment.

Mometasone Furoate cutaneous solution is applied to the skin or scalp.

Apply a few drops of Mometasone Furoate cutaneous solution on the affected areas once a day and massage gently until it disappears.

Do not cover or seal the treated area unless your doctor has told you to.

If you forget to use Mometasone Furoate:

Do not use a double dose to make up for a forgotten dose, continue with the usual schedule, and if you have forgotten many treatments, immediately consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Possible side effects

Like all medicines, Mometasone Furoate cutaneous solution can have side effects, although not everybody gets them.

Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders:

  • Frequent: burning, folliculitis (inflammation of hair follicles), acneiform reaction (acne), itching and signs of skin atrophy.
  • Uncommon: papules (bumps), pustules (skin surface lesions characterized by being small, inflamed, pus-filled, and blister-like.) And itching
  • Rare: irritation, hypertrichosis (excessive hair growth in one area), hypopigmentation (reduction in pigment production), perioral dermatitis (red papules around the mouth), allergic contact dermatitis, skin maceration (excessive loss of protective horny layer), secondary infection, stretch marks and miliary (acne-related lesion in which small white, hard and static cysts appear)

Endocrine disorders:

  • Rare: adrenal cortical suppression (suppression of steroid hormone secretion.)

If you believe that any of the adverse effects you suffer are severe or if you notice any adverse effects not mentioned in this leaflet, tell your doctor or pharmacist.

Precautions and warnings for mometasone furoate

Warnings

If irritation or allergy occurs while using mometasone furoate ointment, you should stop using the medication and should see your doctor for appropriate treatment.

In the case of dermatological infection, your doctor should recommend treatment with an antimycotic (fungal medicine) or appropriate antibiotic.

If a favourable response does not occur quickly, he will stop using this medication until the infection has been adequately controlled.

Any of the undesirable effects reported due to the use of systemic corticosteroids, including adrenal suppression, can also occur with the use of topical corticosteroids, especially in children and infants.

Use in children

Children may experience the following undesirable effects more quickly than adults due to the relationship between the surface area of ​​the skin and body weight: reversible suppression of corticosteroid production by the patient’s adrenal gland and Cushing’s syndrome (resulting clinical condition excess of corticosteroids in the blood) induced by corticosteroids applied to the skin.

The use of corticosteroids on the skin in children should be limited to the minimum dose compatible with an effective therapeutic regimen. Continuous treatment with corticosteroids may interfere with the growth and development of children.

Precautions

If the lesion does not improve after the first days of treatment, the possibility of another associated diagnosis (e.g., bacterial or fungal infection) that will require specific treatment prescribed by your doctor should be considered.

Absorption throughout the body of corticosteroids used on the skin may increase if large areas are treated or with the use of an occlusive technique (closed dressings). In such cases, the necessary precautions should be taken, as well as when long-term treatment is expected, especially in children and infants.

Drug interactions of mometasone furoate

No clinically relevant drug interactions have been reported.

Use of mometasone furoate in pregnancy and breastfeeding

This medication should not be used by pregnant women without medical advice or from the dentist.

As the safety of using mometasone furoate during pregnancy has not been established, the product should be used during pregnancy only if the benefits justify the potential risks to the fetus, mother or newborn.

Mometasone furoate ointment, like any corticosteroid, should not be used by pregnant women in large quantities or for prolonged periods.

It is not known whether the application of corticosteroids to the skin can result in sufficient absorption for the whole body to produce detectable amounts in breast milk. Corticosteroids, administered in a systemic form (orally or through injections), are detected in breast milk in quantities that are likely to have no harmful effects on children receiving breast milk. 

However, a decision must be made between discontinuing breastfeeding or discontinuing treatment, taking into account the importance of treatment for the mother.

How to store

Keep out of the reach and sight of children.

Conservation conditions: No special conservation conditions are required.

Expiration: Do not use MOMETASONA cutaneous solution after the expiry date indicated on the label and on the box.

Medications should not be thrown down the drain or into the trash. Ask your pharmacist how to get rid of the packaging and medications you don’t need. This way, you will help to protect the environment.

 

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References:

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